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In this article let’s learn about how to execute the WP_Query into the WP CLI commands.

Note: If you read some recent articles then you can skip some below steps that are related to plugin creation.

Register WP CLI Command Register WP CLI Command

Register PHP class WordPress_Examples_WP_CLI e.g.

if ( ! class_exists( 'WordPress_Examples_WP_CLI' ) && class_exists( 'WP_CLI_Command' ) ) :
       class WordPress_Examples_WP_CLI extends WP_CLI_Command {

       }
endif;

Here,

We have registered a new class WordPress_Examples_WP_CLI and extend it with WP_CLI_Command.

Add Examples Command Add Examples Command

Now let’s register the examples. E.g.

       WP_CLI::add_command( 'examples', 'WordPress_Examples_WP_CLI' ); 

Here,

We have used the function WP_CLI::add_command() to register our examples command.

The function WP_CLI::add_command() accepts 2 parameters. The first parameter is the command name. Which is examples in our case.

And second is a callback class which is WordPress_Examples_WP_CLI.

Add custom_wp_query sub command Add custom_wp_query sub command

         public function custom_wp_query( $args, $assoc_args ) {
           WP_CLI::line( 'Hello' );
         }

Here,

We have added a function custom_wp_query() with two parameters.

  • $args contain the arguments.
  • $assoc_args contain the associate arguments.

Testing the Command Testing the Command

Open command prompt/terminal. Go to your WordPress setup. I have set up WordPress in D:\xampp\htdocs\dev.test

So, Execute the below commands:

  • cd D:\xampp\htdocs\dev.test
  • wp examples custom_wp_query

You can see the output something like below:

 λ wp examples custom_wp_query
 Hello

This command just shows the string Hello.

Using WP_Query() Using WP_Query()

Its time to execute another command in our WP CLI command with WP_Query().

public function custom_wp_query( $args, $assoc_args ) {

	$query_args = array(
		'post_type'      => 'post',
	
		// Query performance optimization.
		'fields'         => 'ids',
		'no_found_rows'  => true,
		'posts_per_page' => -1,
	);
	
	$query = new WP_Query( $query_args );
	if ( $query->posts ) {
		foreach ( $query->posts as $key => $post_id ) {
			WP_CLI::line( $post_id );
		}
	}

Here, We have executed the WP_Query and print each post ID with WP_CLI::line( $post_id );

Let’s execute the command wp examples custom_wp_query.

λ wp examples custom_wp_query
 162
 160
 89
 1

Using \WP_CLI\Formatter() Using \WP_CLI\Formatter()

Now, Lets try to use \WP_CLI\Formatter() to display the posts list in the table format.

In this example I’m using the post type. You can use any other custom post type which you want.

public function custom_wp_query( $args, $assoc_args ) {

	$query_args = array(
		'post_type' => 'post',
	);
	
	$query = new WP_Query( $query_args );

	$display_fields = array(
		'ID',
		'post_title',
		'post_author',
		'post_date',
		'post_type',
		'post_status',
		'comment_status',
		'comment_count',
		// 'post_date_gmt',
		// 'post_content',
		// 'post_excerpt',
		// 'ping_status',
		// 'post_password',
		// 'post_name',
		// 'to_ping',
		// 'pinged',
		// 'post_modified',
		// 'post_modified_gmt',
		// 'post_content_filtered',
		// 'post_parent',
		// 'guid',
		// 'menu_order',
		// 'post_mime_type',
		// 'filter',
	);

	// Initialize the class.
	$formatter = new \WP_CLI\Formatter( $assoc_args, $display_fields );

	// Display the data.
	$formatter->display_items( $query->posts );
}

Here, I have not passed the ‘fields’ => ‘ids’, in WP_Query $query_args list. Because I want to display some other information on the posts too.

λ wp examples custom_wp_query
 +-----+--------------+-------------+---------------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+---------------+
 | ID  | post_title   | post_author | post_date           | post_type | post_status | comment_status | comment_count |
 +-----+--------------+-------------+---------------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+---------------+
 | 162 | Sample Post  | 1           | 2019-11-05 02:11:16 | post      | publish     | open           | 0             |
 | 160 | Sample Post  | 1           | 2019-11-05 02:10:05 | post      | publish     | open           | 0             |
 | 89  | Another Post | 1           | 2019-10-15 23:32:57 | post      | publish     | open           | 0             |
 | 1   | Hello world! | 1           | 2019-10-05 08:23:44 | post      | publish     | open           | 1             |
 +-----+--------------+-------------+---------------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+---------------+

In recent articles we learn about the --fields associate arguemnts. With --fields associate arguments we can display the specific columns in the result.

For example, lets see only ID, Title & Comment Count on the list.

wp examples custom_wp_query --fields=ID,post_title,comment_count

Here, We have pass the --fields=ID,post_title,comment_count so we can only see these columns.

λ wp examples custom_wp_query --fields=ID,post_title,comment_count
 +-----+--------------+---------------+
 | ID  | post_title   | comment_count |
 +-----+--------------+---------------+
 | 162 | Sample Post  | 0             |
 | 160 | Sample Post  | 0             |
 | 89  | Another Post | 0             |
 | 1   | Hello world! | 1             |
 +-----+--------------+---------------+

How to use the wp_query in WP CLI command.

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